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Early Printed Resources

Page history last edited by francis.lapka@yale.edu 8 years, 5 months ago

Status update, April 17, 2013

 

     * Early Printed Resources Discussion on DCRM-L

               

                                * Hold off until we have a draft of DCRM(B). This is not a priority.

                                * We all agree we would like the scope changed to include pre-1801.

                                * We may also want to add more into the code. The EPR are carry overs from AACR2. So we may want to add more into RDA from DCRM(B).

 


 

Discussion on DCRM-L, April 4-8, 2013

 

***

 

RDA offers guidelines for “Early printed resources” in 14 distinct rules. At the end of this message, I append a compilation of each instance (thanks to Lori Dekydtspotter for fishing these out!). Of the 14 instances, the phrase “Early printed resource(s)” occurs as follows:

  • ·         In the title of a rule:  4 times
  • ·         As a label at the beginning of a rule, in conjunction with RDA exceptions: 8 times
  • ·         As in-line text: in all 14 instances

 

“Early printed resources” also appears in the RDA glossary, where it is defined as “Materials manufactured before the advent of machine printing in approximately 1825-1830.” This definition echoes a sentence from the definition of scope in DCRM(B): “DCRM(B) is especially appropriate for the description of publications produced before the introduction of machine printing in the nineteenth century.”

 

That scope paragraph in DCRM(B) continues: “However, it may be used to describe any printed monograph, including machine-press publications, artists’ books, private press books, and other contemporary materials.” This more inclusive application seems entirely lacking in RDA’s scope for “Early printed resources.”

 

We discussed this issue at the Midwinter meeting of BSC, where there was a consensus that RDA’s current handling of guidelines for “Early printed resources” is probably too limiting. Members of BSC agreed that it would be appropriate to propose a revision to: (a) the “Early printed resources” label, (b) the label’s definition in the RDA glossary, or (c) both. Any revision we propose would be submitted to CC:DA and (provided it is approved), from there to JSC.

 

At this time, I’d like to throw the discussion open to the greater wisdom of the list. I’ll begin with one possibility, bandied among members of the DCRM(B) for RDA revision group:

  • ·         For “early printed resources,” substitute “special collections resources”
  • ·         In the RDA glossary, define “special collections resources” in terms similar to the scope of DCRM(B):  “

 

Note that this proposal has no immediate bearing on DCRM(B) or its revision. The revision to RDA would simply encourage the wider application of a set of RDA guidelines concerning special collections material, for catalogers who may never have the ability or inclination to apply DCRM.

 

Your thoughts and suggestions are desired.

 

Thanks,

Francis

 

***

 

I like this idea, but think the word "printed" should be retained, since special collections also contain manuscripts. Is

 

"For special collections printed resources"

 

too awkward?

 

Also, is "special collections" widely used by our English-speaking colleagues across the water(s)? I see the Bodleian Library website refers to its "special collections", so maybe so. And the various library associations of the UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, etc.

will undoubtedly weigh in if not.

 

Liz O'Keefe

 

***

 

I like “special collections” (better than “rare materials” in fact -- many of the things we deal with aren’t rare, they just need to be preserved indefinitely and made available for specialized research).

 

“Materials” is too broad in this context, though. The RDA guidelines Lori pulled out really are for printed books and serials. Printed pictures (whether printed on a hand press or a machine press), drawn pictures, photographs, manuscripts, etc. are another story. Unless we take the time to review existing statements as they relate to non-printed-word materials, and look at RDA’s existing instructions for “still images” in order to add “special collections” guidance there, I think it needs to be kept within its original scope.

 

Note also that some of these really do only apply to pre-machine-press printed materials (e.g. 2.8.4.1.  Publisher's Name—Scope

For early printed resources, printers and booksellers are treated as publishers.”) Such rules would need individual tweaking rather than a blanket replacement.

 

   Erin.

 

***

 

Yes, "special collections" is widely used in the UK, though the precise meaning differs according to context: sometimes printed special collections (as in the "Directory of Rare Book and Special Collections in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland"); customarily in an institutional context to printed books, archives and manuscripts.

 

Best wishes,

Karen

 

***

 

The specification "early printed resources" is an historical legacy, unrelated to the fundamental principles of bibliographical description, which have to do with accurately recording evidence that printed materials present in their structures and details of manufacture, the latter including more exact description and, where appropriate, transcription of the marks that the printing surfaces left on the paper.

 

This evidence is especially applicable to the correct identification and comparison of manifestations, especially as regards details that support identification of distinct manifestations, which may involve an explicit accounting for variances among items that do not distinguish any group of them as constituting a different manifestation. (In classic bibliographical terms "issue" is largely equivalent to "manifestation"; in abstract terms, it involves establishment of criteria by which to establishment the membership of any one copy in a set that conforms to a certain level of description rather unfortunately known as an "ideal copy" description.)

 

"Special collections cataloging" is an appropriate way to characterize and distinguish our work from "regular" cataloging, given the curatorial perspective by which special collections are assembled and interpreted. The default cataloging approach to general collections materials involves matching items to citations, making use of  physical details only to the extent necessary to ensure the likelihood that a cited source corresponds to a document in hand. This is a key aspect of ordinary scholarly communication, for which "regular" cataloging generally suffices, as it does for the general run of ILL transactions. The whole business of copy cataloging is based on the establishment of equivalence, on the search for things that are the same as each other.

 

The special collections perspective is quite different. The membership of a copy in the set of copies that belong to the same manifestation is always in question. We look for differences--and that is the fundamental bibliographical mindset, the basis of bibliographical description, which is reflected in the descriptive cataloging of special collections materials. It must be emphasized that this has nothing whatever to do with the era in which printing took place.

 

Yes, bibliographical method was originally an element of the historiography of early books, especially incunabula, and in the case of English books, in the textual study of 16th and 17th century vernacular literature. And yes, the kind of evidence that is accounted for by way of  bibliographical analysis and description is less elusive in "hand-press" books, given the machine-based uniformity that is more and more characteristic of the paper, type, binding, etc. of later books. Nevertheless, the application of bibliographical methods in establishing evidential criteria for identifying entities (bibliography) and evidence-based matching of items to entities (cataloging) is valid across the whole chronology of printing, and important to the curation of collections of books of any period .

 

Examples:

 

http://josiah.brown.edu/record=b4761238

 

http://josiah.brown.edu/record=b5395722

 

I am grateful to Lori Dekydtspotter for the work she has done in isolating the few references to "early printed  resources", which are inadequate to full appreciation and treatment of such resources as the evidence for their own history.

 

This is all very much off the top of my head, a lot of undeveloped hints and Advanced Des Bib lecture themes, but I'd be glad to cooperate in articulating it more clearly.

 

RICHARD NOBLE 

 

***

 

You should be aware that the scope of "early printed resources" in RDA was raised by ALA in its responses to drafts of RDA.  There was reluctance to broaden the scope to include more recent special collections, and the phrase and its definition were agreed upon.

This does not mean that the JSC would not be willing to reconsider the question, but you should be aware that this was an intentional decision and that the arguments you cite here were made at the time.

          John Attig

 

***

 

I dare say that JSC's relutance has a lot to do with copy cataloging, in the context of which "early printed resources" are a minority safely segregated from the bulk of resources to which RDA applies. A degree of complexity is expected in the resources themselves, and tolerable where it is reflected in records for them.

 

Nevertheless, as I think my two Lincoln-related examples indicate, it is incorrect to assume that the printed resources of the post-handpress period are necessarily less complex. When actual complexity is ignored the result is oversimplification, and work that fails to realize the purposes expressed as "functional requirements for bibliographic records".

 

We are all sympathetic to the administrative realities that underlie the reluctance to deal with complexity; but "resources" are messy things, and our job as librarians and information professionals is not to pretend otherwise. The bibliography of Ezra Pound is no less crazy than that of Alexander Pope--I cannot, with a kit of blunted tools, correctly catalog the manifestations of the works of either one.

 

RICHARD NOBLE 

 

***

 

I agree fully with Richard about “early” being irrelevant, but again, please don’t forget that RDA’s special instructions for “early printed resources” do NOT apply to “special collections resources.” They apply to SOME special collections resources. Many do not apply to still images.

 

I strongly recommend against anything that would require adding instructions for still images in special collections to RDA. Either you catalog the picture using RDA, or you catalog the picture using DCRM(G). You don’t use modified RDA.  This follows previous practice: either you use Chapter 8 of AACR2, or you use Graphic Materials.

 

    Erin.

 

***

 

Thank you Elizabeth, Erin, Karen, Richard, and John, for your excellent suggestions.

 

As Elizabeth notes, most of these guidelines do not apply well to manuscript material. Her suggestion, “For special collections printed resources,” seemed awkward at first utterance, but less so upon repetition. I am warming to it.

 

I agree with Erin that some of the guidelines for “Early printed resources” are not appropriate for graphic material (and other non-text formats). However it may be worth noting that seven of the “Early printed resources” guidelines—those that fall under Extent of Text (with rule numbers beginning 3.4.5)—are already self-limiting. A cataloger of graphic material, cartographic material, notated music, or 3-d forms would not apply the Extent of Text element, opting instead for the specialized extent elements that correspond to those formats. Outside of extent, the remaining “Early printed resources” guidelines may be more applicable to varying formats, but I’d want more input before proceeding.

 

On the relevancy of “early” to these guidelines, the rule that Erin names (2.8.4.1 Publisher’s Name) seems to apply to early material only; but the rest might apply to resources from any period. I suggest we retain the modifier “early” in this instance, but purge it elsewhere.

 

Thanks John for noting the history of this label. I may try to hunt down records of those earlier discussions. Richard provides an elegant argument for the necessity of proper tools for cataloging not-so-early (but still special) printed resources.

 

As Erin suggests, I have little interest in modifying (or adding to) the substance of these RDA guidelines. Our DCRM revisions will fill that void, in time. But I do think RDA would benefit from a delicate change in scope and terminology for these elements.

 

Francis

 

***

 

Would "For printed special collection resources" get around the awkwardness? Or is it important to keep "printed resources" as a searchable phrase?

 

Also, thanks for the excellent summary, Francis (and I'm grateful for the reminder that it's important to note the heading for the section!).

 

   Erin.

 

***

Just a few things:

1) In this glossary entry:

Item-Specific Carrier Characteristic of Early Printed Resource
A characteristic that applies to the carrier or carriers of the specific early printed item being described and is assumed not to apply to other items exemplifying the same manifestation. Includes rubrication, illumination, and other hand colouring, manuscript additions, and binding.

The last sentence isn't necessarily true even for "early printed resources" which, for example, will sometimes have hand-coloring that is manifestation-level rather than item-level. But, changing "early printed resources" to "special collections printed resources" would make the sentence even more problematic (e.g. publisher's bindings in special collections are generally manifestation-level). Maybe propose revising the beginning of that sentence to "May include ..." instead of "Includes ..."?

Ditto when making changes to the text of the instructions in:

3.21.2.1. Item-Specific Carrier Characteristic of Early Printed Resource—Scope
Resource—Scope

An item-specific carrier characteristic of early printed resource is a characteristic that applies to the carrier or carriers of the specific early printed item being described and is assumed not to apply to other items exemplifying the same manifestation.
Item-specific carrier characteristics of early printed resources include rubrication, illumination, and other hand colouring, manuscript additions, and binding.


This could, in turn, lead to a re-examination of the Appendix I relationship designator "binder" which is currently treated as item-level but really could be either. Sadly, that might lead to splitting the term into "binder of item" and "binder of manifestation" (which I'm sure would cause head-scratching among patrons), so maybe we don't want to bring that up after all. Fortunately, the equivalent RBMS relationship designator "binder" is not FRBR-ized and can stand for either.

2) Should the proposal also address other "early printed ..." wording in RDA, e.g.:


3.5.2.2.Recording Dimensions of Maps, Etc.
Alternative

For early printed and manuscript sheet maps, etc., record the dimensions to the next tenth of a centimetre, using the metric symbol cm.

 

3.12.1.3 Recording Book Formats

Record the book format of an early printed book, etc., using an appropriate term from the list below.


3) Should the proposal also mention instances of "early printed resource" appearing in the Appendixes and in the examples? For example:

Appendix D, 563 $a Binding note
Item-Specific Carrier Characteristic of Early Printed Resource

7.17.1.4 Details of Colour Content

Title and headings printed in red

An early printed resource

 

-Manon

 

***

 

This has been an interesting discussion.

 

I find the comments from John and Manon particularly revealing, and for what it’s worth, think trying to finesse current RDA provisions for “early printed resources” would end up being rather can-of-wormish. Since these provisions are, um, provisional until the publication of DCRM’s based on RDA, I suggest letting them stand and concentrate on getting DCRM(B) revised and the other DCRM’s published.

 

***

 

I believe I’ve tracked down the ALA response that John refers to (part of a larger review of Chapter 3, in Sept 2007):

http://www.rda-jsc.org/docs/5rda-parta-ch3rev-alaresp.pdf

 

As John says, this response (excerpted below) articulates the same concerns we’ve recently raised:

 

Treatment of early printed resources. ALA agrees with the specific provisions included for early printed resources.  However, we continue to be concerned about the scope of these instructions. The limitation to “early” and to “printed” resources is artificial. Many of these instructions are equally applicable to resources from modern fine presses and could in

fact be useful for describing any resource where fuller or more precise description is desired. The revised Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials rules are intended to be applicable broadly to materials in special collections that require this kind of detailed description. The scope of the exceptions in RDA should be similarly broad, allowing the cataloging agency to determine what materials in their collections should be described in this way.

 

ALA also believes that the word “printed” has been used ambiguously in the past. In some cases it has been used to mean textual and in others to mean produced by a printing process. We would like to see RDA avoid the use of this term whenever possible.”

 

I could not track down, however, a JSC reaction to the above (assuming such was ever committed to paper).

 

I sympathize with Deborah’s thoughts about concentrating our (limited) resources where most useful. In my mind, the revisions to RDA proposed here are completely independent of the DCRM(B) revision, and certainly needn’t be undertaken by the DCRM(B) for RDA revision group—especially if there are others who feel strongly enough to see this forward.

 

Francis

 

 

 


 

 

RDA Early Printed Resources.docx

 

RDA “Early Printed Resources” Review

Feb. 12, 2013

 

Rule

Early Printed Resources

1.8.1 [Basic]

Numbers Expressed as Numerals or as Words—General Guidelines

Apply the guidelines given under 1.8.2–1.8.5 when recording numbers expressed as numerals or as words in the elements listed below.

 

  • ·         Numeric and/or alphabetic designation of first issue or part of sequence
  • ·         Chronological designation of first issue or part of sequence
  • ·         Numeric and/or alphabetic designation of last issue or part of sequence
  • ·         Chronological designation of last issue or part of sequence
  • ·         Alternative numeric and/or alphabetic designation of first issue or part of sequence
  • ·         Alternative chronological designation of first issue or part of sequence
  • ·         Alternative numeric and/or alphabetic designation of last issue or part of sequence
  • ·         Alternative chronological designation of last issue or part of sequence
  • ·         Date of production
  • ·         Date of publication
  • ·         Date of distribution
  • ·         Date of manufacture
  • ·         Copyright date
  • ·         Numbering within series
  • ·         Numbering within subseries
  • ·         Year degree granted

 

Alternative LC-PCC-PS 

For early printed resources, transcribe numbers expressed as numerals or as words appearing in numbering of serials, date of production, date of publication, date of distribution, or date of manufacture in the form in which they appear on the source of information.

When recording numbers expressed as numerals or as words in a transcribed element, transcribe them in the form in which they appear on the source of information. Apply the general guidelines on transcription (see 1.7), as applicable.

EXAMPLE

Fifty key literary theorists

Title proper:

55 places to discover your favourite tea

 

2.2.2.2 [Basic]

ResourcesConsisting of One or More Pages, Leaves, Sheets, or Cards (or Images of One or More Pages, Leaves, Sheets, or Cards)

Resources Consisting of One or More Pages, Leaves, Sheets, or Cards (or Images of One or More Pages, Leaves, Sheets, or Cards)

If the resource consists of:

a)       one or more pages, leaves, sheets, or cards (e.g., a book, an issue of a periodical, a poster, a series of sheet maps, a set of flashcards)

or

b)       images of one or more pages, leaves, sheets, or cards (e.g., a microform reproduction of a musical score, a PDF file of a text, microform reproductions of a set of sheet maps, a JPEG image of a photograph) use the title page, title sheet, or title card (or image thereof) as the preferred source of information.

Alternative

If the resource consists of microform or computer images of one or more pages, leaves, sheets, or cards, use an eye-readable label bearing a title that is permanently printed on or affixed to the resource in preference to the image of the title page, title sheet, or title card.

If the resource lacks a title page, title sheet, or title card (or image thereof), use as the preferred source of information the first of the following sources that bears a title:

a) a cover (or an image of a cover)

b) a caption (or an image of a caption)

c) a masthead (or an image of a masthead)

d) a colophon (or an image of a colophon).

Exception

Early printed resources. If an early printed resource (or a reproduction thereof) lacks a title page, title sheet, or title card (or image thereof), use as the preferred source of information the first of the following sources that bears a title:

a) a colophon (or an image of a colophon).

b) a cover (or an image of a cover)

c) a caption (or an image of a caption)

If none of the sources listed above bears a title, use as the preferred source of information another source within the resource that bears a title, giving preference to a source in which the information is formally presented.

If the resource does not contain any of the sources specified above, use as the preferred source of information another source forming part of the resource itself, giving preference to sources in which the information is formally presented.

 

2.8.4 [Basic]

Publisher's Name

CORE ELEMENT

If more than one publisher's name appears on the source of information, only the first recorded is required.

2.8.4.1

Scope

 

Scope

A publisher's name▼ is the name of a person, family, or corporate body responsible for publishing, releasing, or issuing a resource.

For early printed resources, printers and booksellers are treated as publishers.

 

3.4.5.2

Single Volume With Numbered Pages, Leaves, or Columns

 

Single Volume With Numbered Pages, Leaves, or Columns

For a resource consisting of a single volume, record the extent in terms of pages, leaves, or columns as appropriate to the presentation used in the resource, applying the following general guidelines:

a) If the volume is paginated (i.e., if there are page numbers on both sides of the leaves), record the number of pages.

b) If the volume is foliated (i.e., if there are leaf numbers on only one side of the leaves), record the number of leaves.

c) If the volume consists of pages with more than one column to a page and is numbered in columns, record the number of columns.

d) If the volume consists of sequences of leaves and pages, or pages and numbered columns, or leaves and numbered columns, record each sequence.

Exceptions 

Early printed resources. For early printed resources, record each sequence of leaves, pages, or columns in the terms and form presented. If the resource is printed in pages but numbered as leaves, record the numbering as leaves. If required, record more precise information about pagination, blank leaves, or other aspects of collation, either by expanding the extent (if this can be done succinctly) or by making a note (see 3.22.2.9).

Updating loose-leafs. If the resource is an updating loose-leaf, record 1 volume followed by loose-leaf, in parentheses.

 

EXAMPLE

1 volume (loose-leaf)

 

3.4.5.3.2

Inessential Matter

Disregard unnumbered sequences of inessential matter (advertising, blank pages, etc.).

Exception 

Early printed resources. For early printed resources, record pages containing advertisements (when this can be done succinctly) if those pages are:

a)       included in the same pagination sequence as the text

or

b)       printed on the pages of an initial or final gathering also containing leaves or pages of text

or

c)       printed on a separate gathering in a resource that is continuously signed.

EXAMPLE

40 leaves, 8 unnumbered pages

 

Otherwise, make a note (see 3.22.2.9).

 

3.4.5.3.1 Numbered and Unnumbered Sequences  

If the resource consists of both numbered and unnumbered sequences of pages, leaves, or columns, disregard the unnumbered sequences, unless:

a)       an unnumbered sequence constitutes a substantial part of the resource (see also 3.4.5.8)

or

b)       an unnumbered sequence includes pages, etc., that are referred to in a note.

 

Exception 

Early printed resources. For early printed resources, record unnumbered sequences of pages, leaves, or columns.

 

EXAMPLE

12 unnumbered pages, 72 pages, 10 unnumbered pages, 48 pages, 6 unnumbered pages, 228 pages, 16 unnumbered pages

91 leaves, 1 unnumbered leaf

Last leaf blank

 

When recording a sequence of unnumbered pages, etc., record:

either

a)       the exact number (if the number is readily ascertainable) followed by unnumbered pages, etc.

or

b)       an estimated number preceded by approximately

or

c)       unnumbered sequence of pages, etc.

 

 EXAMPLE

33 leaves, 31 unnumbered leaves

Unnumbered sequence constitutes substantial part; exact number of leaves ascertainable

8, vii, approximately 300, 73 pages

Unnumbered sequence constitutes substantial part; number of pages estimated

27 pages, unnumbered sequence of leaves

Numbered pages and a sequence of unnumbered leaves

8 unnumbered pages, 155 pages

Bibliography referred to in a note appears on 6th preliminary page

 

3.4.5.4

Change in Form of Numbering within a Sequence

 

If the form of numbering within a sequence changes (e.g., from roman to arabic numerals), ignore the numbering of the first part of the sequence.

 

EXAMPLE

176 pages

Pages numbered: i–xii, 13–176

  

Exception 

Early printed resources. For early printed resources, record the numbering in the form presented.

 

EXAMPLE

xii pages, 1 unnumbered page, 14–176 pages

First twelve pages of the sequence numbered in lowercase roman numerals, followed by one unnumbered page, followed by remainder of the sequence numbered in arabic numerals

3.4.5.8

Complicated or Irregular Paging, Etc.

If the resource has complicated or irregular paging, etc., record the number of pages, leaves, or columns using one of the following methods:

a)       Record the total number of pages, leaves, or columns (excluding those that are blank or contain advertising or other inessential matter) followed by in various pagings, in various foliations, or in various numberings, as appropriate.

 

 

EXAMPLE

1000 pages in various pagings

256 leaves in various foliations

1283 columns in various numberings

 

b)

Record the number of pages, leaves, or columns in the main sequences of the pagination and add the total number of the remaining variously numbered or unnumbered sequences.

EXAMPLE

560 pages, 223 pages, 217 variously numbered pages

Resource with 1000 pages in various pagings

366 pages, 98 pages, 99 unnumbered pages

 

c)

Record 1 volume (various pagings).

EXAMPLE

1 volume (various pagings)

Resource with 1000 pages in various pagings

 

Exception 

Early printed resources. For early printed resources, record the paging, etc., in the form and sequence presented.

 

EXAMPLE

12 unnumbered leaves, 74 leaves, 32 unnumbered leaves, 62 columns, 9 unnumbered pages

 

3.4.5.9

Leaves or Pages of Plates

 

If the leaves or pages of plates in a resource are separate from the sequence or sequences of pages or leaves of text, etc., record the number of leaves or pages of plates at the end of the sequence or sequences of pagination, etc., whether the plates are found together or distributed throughout the resource, or even if there is only one plate. If the numbering of the leaves or pages of plates is complex or irregular, apply the instructions given under 3.4.5.8.

EXAMPLE

246 pages, 32 pages of plates

x, 32, 73 pages, 1 leaf of plates

 If the resource contains both leaves and pages of plates, record the number in terms of whichever is predominant.

EXAMPLE

323 pages, 19 unnumbered pages of plates

Contains 16 pages and 3 leaves of plates

 

Exception 

Early printed resources. For early printed resources, if the leaves and pages of plates are numbered, or if there are both numbered and unnumbered plates, record each sequence of leaves and pages of plates in the appropriate terms.

 

EXAMPLE

246 pages, 38 leaves of plates, 24 pages of plates

Disregard unnumbered sequences of plates, unless:

a)       an unnumbered sequence of plates constitutes a substantial part of the resource (see also 3.4.5.8)

or

b)       an unnumbered sequence includes plates that are referred to in a note.

 

EXAMPLE

xii, 24 pages, 212 leaves of plates, 43 unnumbered leaves of plates

Unnumbered sequence constitutes substantial part

xvi, 249 pages, 12 unnumbered leaves of plates

Unnumbered sequence includes a plate referred to in a note

3.4.5.14

Single Sheet

Record the extent of a resource consisting of a single sheet as 1 sheet.

 

EXAMPLE

1 sheet

If the sheet is designed to be read in pages when folded, record the extent as 1 folded sheet followed by the number of imposed pages, in parentheses.

 

EXAMPLE

1 folded sheet (8 pages)

Exception 

Early printed resources. For an early printed resource consisting of a single sheet designed to be used unfolded (whether issued folded or unfolded), include a count of the number of pages printed, not counting blank pages.

For a single sheet folded into multiple panels, designed to be used folded, include a count of the number of physical panels on one side of the sheet when unfolded, in parentheses; include both blank panels and panels containing text, illustrations, etc., in the count.

EXAMPLE

1 folded sheet (16 panels)

Provide details of the sheet's layout (including the numbering of the panels) in a note if desired (see 3.22.2.9).

 

3.21.2.1

Item-Specific Carrier Characteristic of Early Printed Resource

Scope

An item-specific carrier characteristic of earlyprinted resource▼ is a characteristic that applies to the carrier or carriers of the specific early printed item being described and is assumed not to apply to other items exemplifying the same manifestation.

Item-specific carrier characteristics of early printed resources include rubrication, illumination, and other hand colouring, manuscript additions, and binding.

 

3.21.2.3

Recording Item-Specific Carrier Characteristics of an Early Printed Resource

 

For early printed resources, in addition to imperfections, etc. (see 3.21.1.3), record special features of the item in hand.

 

EXAMPLE

  • ·         Pages 1–16 misbound after page 84
  • ·         Imperfect: wanting leaves 12 and 13 (b6 and c1); also the blank last leaf (S8)
  • ·        
  • ·        
  • ·        
  • ·         Inscription on inside of front cover: Theodorinis ab Engelsberg
  • ·        
  • ·         Original, signed by John Hancock
  • ·         Marginalia by Robert Graves

 

3.22.2.9

Early Printed Resources

 

For early printed resources, make notes giving details of pagination not recorded formally as part of the extent element (see 3.4.5.23.4.5.13), or on aspects of collation, the layout of sheets, etc., if they are considered important for identification or selection

 

EXAMPLE

Signatures: A–Z8, 2A–M8

Signatures: a–v8 x6

 Make notes on the number of columns or lines, type measurements, frame measurements, etc., if they are considered important for identification or selection.

EXAMPLE

24 line; type 24G

Within single border (23.0×16.3 cm); text in 11 vertical lines

 

 

 

Comments (6)

francis.lapka@yale.edu said

at 8:35 am on Feb 25, 2013

While some of these are less likely to be used for material published after 1825 (such as 2.2.2.2 and 2.8.4, perhaps), I think all of them *could* (sometimes) be.

francis.lapka@yale.edu said

at 8:56 am on Feb 25, 2013

While modifying the "Early printed resources" label, we should also examine which of these apply to *printed* resources only. At a cursory glance, I'd say that 1.8.1 could apply to mss too, 2.2.2.2 and 2.8.4 would not apply to mss, and all of the extent instances (except for 3.4.5.3.2) are a solid maybe (we'd want input from DCRMMss, I suppose).

francis.lapka@yale.edu said

at 8:59 am on Feb 25, 2013

Should we entertain the notion of a label like "Special Collections Material." We could then define such material in the RDA glossary with something close to DCRM(B) I.4: " ... is especially appropriate for the description of publications produced before the introduction of machine printing in the nineteenth century. However, it may be used to describe any printed monograph, including machine-press publications, artists’ books, private press books, and other contemporary materials."

Morag Boyd said

at 8:27 am on Feb 26, 2013

I like the idea of a broader label, and "Special Collections Material" in one that makes a great deal of sense in my context. We certainly apply the DCRM(B) A8 concept of "special collections cataloging" in our daily cataloging to all types of materials as you noted above. I think a broader label will support the continuation of the concept of "special collections cataloging" by selectively applying the outcome of our work to things clearly not "early printed resources." I think we go with a label like "Special Collections Material" we could further specify if a rule applies only to printed (or published?) materials ...

Morag Boyd said

at 4:25 pm on Feb 26, 2013

Oh, will also support future work in other formats, without needing many labels

lodekydt@indiana.edu said

at 9:01 am on Feb 28, 2013

I also like the broader label of "Special Collections Material."

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